Chronic Fatigue – Brain Fog – Anemia

Did your lab results come back “Normal” or “Within Range” but you still suffer from Chronic Fatigue, Brain Fog, Joint pain and Muscle aches?

When the lab tests came in. The labs were within normal or functional ranges. Some of the markers may be towards the top or bottom edge of the Medical or Functional ranges. But nothing was out of range. Maybe one or two of the red blood cell markers are out of range. But, there is no specific anemic pattern.

How can you have all those symptoms but nothing is out of range? There are several concepts to understand:

Lab tests are about probabilities not absolutes.

A complete blood count (CBC) gives important information about  the kinds and numbers of cells in the blood, especially red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. However, it gives very little information as to the actual shape of the red blood cells. Many of the red blood cell deformities are reported in the RBC test numbers. However, Doctors may not know the relationship between the shape of the red blood cells and lab markers.

Red Blood Deformability

During their 120 day lifespan, red blood cells repeatedly traverses the capillaries of the vascular beds and endothelial tissue of the spleen, both of which are narrower than their smallest dimension. This necessitates the ability of the red blood cells to undergo repeated, extensive, and reversible deformations. Repeated membrane deformations induce ion and water permeability changes in the red blood cells.

Red blood cell (RBC) deformability refers to the ability of the RBC to change shape without rupturing. This is an important property because RBC must change the shape extensively under the influence of mechanical forces in the blood flow or while passing through the capillaries and tissues. The age of the blood cells are also important when considering circulating RBCs.

The shape change of the RBCs should be reversible and the biconcave shape is maintained after passing through the deforming forces. In other words RBCs behave like a elastic bodies, while they are able to change shape and spring back while passing through capillaries and tissues.

CBC Morphologic Echinocyte

 

Damaged Red Blood Cells

Impaired red blood cell (RBC) deformability, which occurs with inflammation, shifting pH, and altered blood chemistry contributes to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndromes by impairing tissue microvascular blood flow.

In red blood cell agglutination, two erythrocytes adhering to one another are counted as one with automated counters, and larger clumps are not counted as red blood cells at all. This leads to a “decrease” in red cell count and a falsely elevated MCV.

The age of the red blood cells is involved in aggregation. Relatively young red blood cells have approximately three times lower the aggregability when compared with older cells.

RBC Rouleau

Autoagglutination activity is known to be a marker of virulence in gram-negative bacterial pathogens, including Mycoplasma, Vibrio, Bordetella, Neisseria, and Yersinia and Aeromonas species. Pilins or outer membrane proteins of these bacteria have been demonstrated to be autoagglutinins.

Autoagglutination represents clumping of an individual’s red blood cells by their serum due to the RBCs being coated on their surface by antibodies. The antibodies are of the class of IgM in 85% of cases and in 15% a subtype of IgG. Immunoglobulin testing for the IgM class is rarely done.

CBC Morphologic DNA damage

If you are suffering from chronic fatigue, brain fog, joint pain and muscle aches, while being told your lab tests are normal or ambiguous. Deformed red blood cells can not carry oxygen to your body’s tissues. You need someone that recognizes how the red blood cell indices apply to the shape of the red blood cells.

Call Dr. Dave at Wellness Alternatives today. 530-615-4083

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